Monthly Archives: July 2016

Books!: The Forger’s Spell

One recurring theme of this blog and/or my interests is the looted art of World War 2. I’ve read books and watched movies and even trained my internet history to find me articles related to this subject. (I say that I trained my internet, which is a lot less creepy than saying the internet is stalking me.)

Thus, one day I was at the public library (tbh that’s how many of my life’s adventures begin) and I found this book on a Dutch art forger who swindled the Nazis and made a fortune. The book is called The Forger’s Spell: A True Story of Vermeer, Nazis, and the Greatest Art Hoax of the Twentieth Century (2009). Even better, the book predated The Monuments Men book (2013), thereby also predating the movie, which meant it existed before the Nazi Art Thing was a thing.

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Books!: Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War

At this point, it was many moons and a few short posts ago that I saw Ric Burns’ new film on The Pilgrims, which was part of the Smithsonian’s History Film Forum. Write-up here. (If you haven’t seen The Pilgrims yet, go do it.) The summary of the film is that the founding of Plimoth Colony has but the most passing of relationships with the popular perceptions we celebrate every Thanksgiving holiday.

Shortly after that I was at the library when the colorful cover of Mayflower caught my eye. I saw the author was one Nathaniel Philbrick, who most recently is known for having written the book on which the recent Chris Hemsworth movie, In the Heart of the Sea, is based. I have neither seen the film nor read the book, but I had heard the book was positively reviewed by people who matter. That was enough for me, so Mayflower came home with me.

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